Spiritual questions and answers

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Deeper perception – What to do with it?

By Stephen Russell-Lacy.

The ancient mariners navigated their sea route at night by the stars. These tiny twinkling bits of knowledge high in the night time sky offer useful information. The same could be said for our spiritual journey. Likewise, navigation is important for finding a path for the soul. We need higher knowledge intuitively perceived. Something that provides deeper perception than the facts of science can provide.
This deeper perception might be an insight that comes during self-reflection. Or perhaps it is an intuition we become aware of during meditation. Alternatively, it could be an idea found in sacred writing.
It can be assumed that seeing what is good and true can help us steer a course through the complexities of life. Possibly enable us to find meaning and purpose in our troubles. Even offer encouragement and hope.
But is this certain? Is deeper perception of itself sufficient for transforming our lives?

Examples of deeper perception

I may pick up on the idea that there are two realms of reality – a realm of physical objects and a realm of consciousness or spirit, not limited by space or time. As a result, I may toy with the thought. Play around with it. Bring it into conversation. Moreover, I might even use it as a working hypothesis.
An intuition may come whilst meditating. For example, the sense of the oneness of all life; everything somehow connected; an essence of reality behind outward appearance. This insight may stay or depart.

Huge variety of spiritual knowledge and awareness

The world is teeming with tiny seeds of wisdom. We wake up to them again when we hear them clearly articulated.
Another deeper perception is self-knowledge. For example, knowing about one’s own strengths and weaknesses, successes and failings, dreams and fears. One weakness might be winning arguments, gaining status and impressing people without being concerned about the consequences. Personal development means living with consideration and integrity.
In line with the notion of karma, it is said that sooner or later we get what we give – what goes round comes round.
Realising the importance of compassion for oneself and for other people is another example. This is related to the so-called Golden rule. Wilson Van Dusen (mystic and clinical psychologist) has pointed out that a form of this idea is found in various religions.

Do to others as you would have them do to you (Christianity)

What is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow man (Judaism)

No one is a believer until he desires for his brother that which he desires for himself (Islam)

Do not do unto others what would cause you pain if done unto you (Hinduism)

Hurt not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful (Buddhism)

Regard your neighbours gain as your own gain and your neighbour’s loss as your own loss (Taoism)

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