The Origin of Evil

VII. The Origin of Evil

“Man himself is the origin of evil: not that that origin was put into man from creation, but that he himself, by turning from God to himself, put it into himself.”—C.L. 444.

INQUIRER.—My knowledge of the New Church doctrines is limited; but I understand that your views on religious subjects are essentially different from those generally taught.

MISSIONARY.—The idea may be new to you, as it is to many, but the fact is that we have a system of doctrine which has been Divinely revealed for the spiritual enlightenment of the world, and thus for the salvation of the human race. That is, the genuine truths of the Divine Word are now made known by the revelation of its internal sense. And this we have in the Writings of the New Church.

I.—What do you mean by the genuine truths of the Word? The expression is new to me.

M.—We employ new terms to express distinctively new truths, and to convey definitely spiritual ideas, respecting religious subjects. By genuine truths we mean the spirit, or real import, of the Word, which is within the mere letter, as the soul is within the body. For the mere letter is no more the essential Word than the merely physical body is the actual man. Both of these, indeed, are only the outward form.

I.—There is a passage where the Lord Jesus Christ says: “The words that I speak unto you are spirit, and they are life” (John vi. 63). I suppose the terms spirit and life have reference to the spiritual sense?

M.—Yes; the Apostle Paul also emphatically declares that “the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life” (2 Cor. iii. 6). It is by virtue of the spiritual sense of the Word that we obtain a knowledge of its genuine truths, and from these are derived the living, rational, definite ideas, which alone can make us really intelligent. The literal sense in itself, though also Divine, is full of contradictions, because these are mere appearances of truth.

I.—The Scriptures say that God is love, also that He is angry with the wicked every day. This is surely a contradiction, and it looks as if this must be an apparent truth; for God certainly cannot be infinite love and infinite wrath at the same time. The idea does not agree with the revealed truth of His immutability. Since God is love, and is also unchangeable— the same yesterday, to-day, and for ever,—it seems to me that He must be love only, and that He cannot be angry with any one.

M.—Your remarks are in accordance with sound logic, and your conclusion is quite correct. That God is angry, that He manifests feelings of wrath or revenge, that He caused evil and created a hell, that He is arbitrary and cruel in the treatment of some of His creatures, that He casts the wicked into hell, and consigns His enemies to eternal torment in unquenchable fire, and a thousand other things, are all mere appearances of truth in the literal sense of the Scriptures.

I.—How, then, did evil originate? If God did not create hell, who did? And in what manner are the wicked punished, if God does not punish them?

M.—Ah! there you propound questions that require a great deal of time and consideration to answer properly. I fear it may not be possible for me to reply to them as fully as the importance of the subject demands. But we shall make as good use of the time at our disposal as we can.

I.—It is frequently much easier to ask questions than to answer them. But I want light on these dark problems; for it seems to me there is in the old systems of belief a fearful confusion of ideas concerning the points I have indicated.

M.—There is no doubt but that many of the theologians of the day are without any rational doctrine, to enable them satisfactorily to explain matters of this nature. There is great need for light. And He who is Himself the Light of the World desires that all His children should be brought from the darkness of ignorance to the light of intelligence and wisdom.

I.—That surely must be so.

M.—Let us now consider your questions, in the order in which you have put them. As to the first, respecting the. origin of evil, allow me to premise that God, our Creator, gives to man, His creature, the prerogative of thinking, of willing, and of acting in freedom. In the exercise of the faculties with which he is endowed, man has the ability to receive truth into his understanding, and at the same time good into his will, and thus to live according to Divine order. Or, he can do the reverse of this—think what is false, will what is evil, and also live contrary to Divine order. And to come into a life contrary to Divine order is to confirm the false and the evil, and thus wilfully to transgress the laws of God, and so to become wicked and perverse.

I.—Why did God not create man so that it was impossible for him to sin?

M.—Because He could not do so.

I.—Is that not, an unwarrantable assertion? Do you mean to say that anything is impossible with God? Surely there is no limit to His power.

M.—In the true sense of the word, there is no limit to the power of the Almighty. But it is impossible for the Lord to do anything that is contrary to His Divine order. The Lord is the God of heaven; and “order is heaven’s first law.” It is an absolute law of the Divine order that man should be a free agent. As a matter of fact, God could not create man, to be man in the true sense of the word, without endowing him with distinctively human faculties, and giving him the ability to exercise these faculties in freedom. Without free agency, man would be a sort of mechanical creature, and not really a human being.

I.—Very true; but how is man’s free agency related to the origin of evil?

M.—We shall see presently. And here let me assure you that our doctrine, fully considered, satisfactorily explains (to any one that can understand rational truth) the difficult problem as to the origin of evil.

I.—I am greatly pleased to learn that there is such a doctrine.

M.—In most ancient times, men, from the purely natural state to which they were created, passed by stages of development into the spiritual state; and thereafter by orderly progression they at length reached the celestial state. These things are described in the sublime symbolism of the first chapter of Genesis. Then, in times immemorial, the fall of man took place. The fall of man was a gradual degeneracy, continuing through many ages, and not a sudden transition from a good and holy to an evil and wicked state. The beginning of the fall originated in the desire, in the minds of the ancients, to understand things heavenly and Divine by means of the senses, that is, to prefer the evidence of the senses to revealed truth; or, as it may also be expressed, to believe the apparent truth from without rather than the real truth from within.

I.—What about the forbidden fruit? It has always seemed to me a queer thing that sin and death, disease, and all but universal misery, should be introduced into our world by the simple act of a person eating an apple.

M.—The account in Genesis is not to be taken literally, of course. It is purely symbolic language; and it is nonsense to imagine that physical, spiritual, and eternal death could come in consequence of eating any natural fruit. In fact, the literal interpretation of the Scripture in question quite defeats itself. We read: “Of every tree in the garden thou mayest freely eat; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof, thou shalt surely die” (Gen. ii. 16, 17). But he did not literally die in that day. For again we read: “And all the days that Adam lived were nine hundred and thirty years: and he died” (Gen. v. 5). The Scripture, therefore, has no reference to physical death, as the literalists suppose. It is exclusively spiritual death, the death of the soul, that is treated of.

I.—How do you define the term “spiritual death”?

M.—When man ceases to receive life from the Lord, who is the infinite Fountain of life, he is spiritually dead. A man may be alive as to his body, but nevertheless be dead as to his soul. Of himself, man is spiritually dead, because of the perversion of his life, which is, by inheritance, his natural state. For this reason man requires to be regenerated, or born anew. But to those who confirm themselves in evil, and will not permit themselves to be brought into a state of good, the Lord says: “Ye will not come unto me, that ye might have life” (John v. 40).

I.—Now I should like you to explain something of the spirit of the passages you have quoted from Genesis.

M.—We will try. In the first place, then, let us consider that we do not understand the words of our Lord in their literal sense, when, for example, He says: “Except ye eat the flesh and drink the blood of the Son of Man, ye have no life in you” (John vi. 53). Nor does a consistent method of interpretation require us to take the Scripture literally, when we read in Genesis about eating of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. For this, in like manner as the Lord’s words in John, has a spiritual sense. Eating the flesh and drinking the blood of the Son of Man, means to receive and to appropriate the Divine good and the Divine truth from the Lord, in order that we may have spiritual and eternal life.

I.—Quite different from the notion of transubstantiation, to which millions in the Christian world still adhere.

M.—Eating of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, in the symbolic style of expressing ideas, signifies man’s ascribing life and all things of his being, to himself, instead of to the Lord. But from what is revealed to us in the Word and the Writings, we learn that for man to be truly human, he must freely acknowledge that he receives life and all things good and true,—all pure motives, heavenly aspirations, ennobling thoughts and affections,—only from the Divine. Of himself, man is nothing but evil, and prone to confirm himself in false notions of every kind. Whatever is of the genuine human character in him, is from above. It is written: “A man can receive nothing, except it be given him from heaven” (John iii. 27).

I.—All very true! And the ancient philosophers were therefore quite right when they said, that “in God we live, and move, and have our being.” It appears that in this respect they were really wiser than many of the learned of modern times, because these do not acknowledge this grand truth.

M.—It is the fundamental truth of the philosophy of human existence. God the Lord alone is self-existent, essential Life, Infinite, Divine, All-Good, All-Wise, Omnipotent, and Omniscient. Man, on the other hand, is a recipient of life, and of all human qualities, by influx from the Lord. The flowers and trees, the things of universal nature,—the countless forms of use and beauty, which adorn the bosom of the earth,—would immediately be dissipated, if the inflowing of the heat and light of the sun were to be withdrawn. The Lord is to the human soul, and to the forms in man recipient of life, what the sun is to the forms and substances of nature.

I.—Your comparisons seem to me quite legitimate, and they help to make the subject intelligible. But I must not interrupt you.

M.—We shall be able to understand this matter of the origin of evil more clearly, when we consider that both evil and falsity are the perversion of good and truth. That is to say, when men come into a state in which they were inclined to abuse their freedom, by thinking and willing, and hence acting, contrary to Divine order, then good and truth from the Lord (the essential principles which form the interiors of the human mind) were turned .into the opposite. Thus evil and falsity had their beginning in man.

I.—But how did men come into a state such as you describe?

M.—Because they permitted themselves to be deceived by the serpent. That is, they were not content to allow themselves to be led by the Lord; but came into a state in which they desired to be led by their own intelligence. They gave way to an inclination to love self and to depend upon their own prudence, instead of continuing to love the Lord supremely, and to trust implicitly in His Divine Providence. Their self-love then induced them to begin to believe nothing but what they could comprehend by means of the senses. This was the very origin of the degeneracy of the human race. And it continued to operate, until, in the fullness of time, the Lord Jesus Christ—who was “God manifest in the flesh”—said to the sensuous-minded Jews: “Ye serpents, ye generation of vipers, how can ye escape the condemnation of hell?” (Matt. xxiii. 33).

I.—You said the language about those things in Genesis is symbolic. I suppose, then, we are not to understand that a serpent ever actually talked with a woman, and persuaded her to eat fruit?

M.—It is certain that no serpent ever literally talked. Nor did the knowledge of good and evil ever literally grow on a tree. The serpent is mentioned in the Word to represent the sensual principle in man, that is, all things which belong to his senses. To be a full and perfect man, one requires the sensual principle also. But this must be made subordinate. The higher principles of human nature should rule in man, and not those of his lower nature. To allow the sensuous propensities to become predominant, is the beguilement of the serpent.

I.—I now begin to get some light upon the subject. And it is gratifying, for I have been in the dark quite long enough.

M.—Let me endeavour to make it still more plain. When men, in most ancient times, began to feel inclined to think that they were wise and good from themselves, and so gradually ceased to be willing to acknowledge that they could only be really wise and good from the Lord, then they did that which is meant by eating of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. The celestial man—the man of the celestial Church—so long as he remained in a state of integrity, delighted to acknowledge that the Lord is All in all; that He every instant imparts life and the power to think and act; and that in His infinite mercy He will confer upon His children the joys of angelic life to all eternity. But it is evident that man fell from a state of innocence and purity; that a gradual degeneracy ensued; that men in the process of the ages became wicked, hard-hearted, and cruel; “earthly, sensual, and devilish.”

I.—No one can deny that such has been the outcome. And it is lamentable to think of the state of the Christian world to-day. The effects of the degeneration of the race are, in one form or another, constantly brought under our notice. There are shams, frauds, and deceptions of all sorts. There is a vast deal of disregard for the rights of one’s fellow-man. The Golden Rule is at this day at a fearful discount, although it is the only rule of life and conduct by which we can practise the principles of true religion. Men are careless as to what they believe, and equally so as to how they live. Large numbers in Christendom have become, or are becoming, sceptics, scoffers, rationalists, and atheists. In fact, when one reads so much about the evil doings of people as we read nowadays, it sometimes actually makes one feel ashamed of human nature. But I do not wish to change the subject. Please go on with your explanations.

M.—I was about to say something in reply to your question as to who created hell. Evil and false principles, in the aggregate, constitute hell. The angels receive the Divine good and the Divine truth from the lord, and of these the heavens are formed. But evil spirits, who are devils and satans, in the very act of reception, turn good and truth into the opposite, and of these the hells are composed. We know that reception is according to the character or quality of the recipient.

I.—It evidently could not be otherwise.

M.—We have illustrations of this in nature. Look at the difference existing in the forms of the vegetable and animal kingdoms. The wheat and the tares come up together. The rose and the thorn may grow side by side. The fruit-tree and the poison-producing plant flourish in the same soil. The same physical conditions surround the wolf and the lamb. The owl and the dove breathe the same atmosphere. All these things are developed, and live by virtue of the influences of the heat and light of the sun. But the forms, receiving these influences, being essentially different, the effects produced are various accordingly. The wheat gives us bread for our nourishment; the tares are useless weeds. The bloom and fragrance of the rose delight our senses of sight and smell; but there is nothing very attractive about the thorn. The luscious fruit gratifies our taste, and promotes good health; but the poisonous will destroy the body altogether. The wolf and the lamb are as opposite in their dispositions as they can be; and so are the owl and the dove.

I.—The Lord says: “Behold, I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves” (Matt. x. 16). By the sheep are evidently meant the good, and by wolves the evil.

M.—I have not quite finished the point of my illustration. I was about to add, that the Divine love and the Divine wisdom proceed from the Lord as the sun of heaven, for the benefit of all, irrespective of state. That He is no respecter of persons is plainly stated in the Scriptures; and is also meant when it is declared that “He maketh His sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust” (Matt. v. 45). Love and wisdom, received by an angel, make him a form of heaven; but the same influences are with a devil turned into the opposite, and he becomes a form of hell. The angel is in pure, genuine, heavenly delight; and the evil spirit is in his own impure, sensual, infernal delight, agreeable to his state.

I.—I should like to hear an explanation of the difference between devils and satans.

M.—The devils are those in whom evil predominates, and who from evils are in falsities. The satans are those in whom falsity predominates, and who from falsities are in evils. The Lord said: “One of you is a devil,” because the one referred to, namely, Judas Iscariot, was under the influences of evil to such a degree that he finally betrayed the Lord (John vi. 70). And the Lord on one occasion called Peter, Satan, because that disciple objected to the Lord’s passing through those things which were necessary for Him to fully glorify His human, and to finish the work of redemption (Matt. xvi. 23).

I.—Your view seems to militate against the idea of a personal devil. How about His Satanic Majesty?

M.—There is no personal devil, in the sense of one big devil, or evil deity, who has supreme power in the internal regions, and rules there, as many have imagined. It is written: “I am the First, and I am the Last, and beside me there is no God” (Isa. xliv. 6). By devil and satan are respectively meant all evil and falsity in the aggregate. In the Apocalypse, for example, we read of “the dragon, that old serpent, called the Devil and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world” (xii. 9).

I.—I must now remind you of the question concerning the punishment of the wicked.

M.—The Lord says of those who confirm themselves in evil and in falsity, and make infernal loves the chief delight of their lives: “These shall go away into everlasting punishment” (Matt. xxv. 46). This expresses the truth of the matter. The wicked go away from the Lord. They turn their back upon heaven, with all its shining splendours, its glories, and its unspeakable felicities, and of their own free choice go down into the regions of eternal darkness and spiritual death. They have perverted the order of their life, have become forms of evil, and hence are like owls that cannot endure the light of the sun.They cannot abide in the presence of the beneficent Lord of heaven. And thus we read in the Apocalypse, that they hide themselves in dens, and say to the mountains and the rocks, “Fall on us, and hide us from the face of Him that sitteth on the throne, and from the wrath of the Lamb” (Matt. vi. 15, 16).

I.—The Lord, then, is not responsible for the sufferings of the wicked?

M.—Certainly not. The Lord desires all to be happy, in time and throughout eternity. And all who come unto Him that they may have life truly human, shall be blessed for evermore. But the Lord cannot compel any one to do right, to live a good life, and go to heaven; because this would be contrary to the Divine law of human free agency. It is sad to think that it should be so; but it is the insane delight of the wicked to violate the laws of Divine order, which have been ordained of God for the direction and guidance, the well-being and spiritual prosperity, of His children. And by the wilful violation of these beneficent laws, without which the universe could not exist for a moment, the evil bring punishment upon themselves; and this as inevitably as effects succeed causes. Let us remember that there is absolutely nothing arbitrary about the Lord’s dealings with His creatures. He is just in all His ways. He doeth all things well. He is, most truly, our Father in the heavens. We, His children, may confidently trust in Him, and in all circumstances of life look up to Him; for His Divine hand will lead us, and His Divine Providence will protect us, that no evil may do us harm. The Lord, whom alone we ought to acknowledge and worship, is pure Love Itself, infinite and unchanging. And it is a genuine truth, expressed in the letter of the Divine Word, where we read: “The Lord is good unto all, and His tender mercies are over all His works” (Ps. cxlv. 9).

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41 thoughts on “The Origin of Evil

  1. Thanks for your follow. I do have questions about what Bible you are using. The KJV does chapter and verse, but I don’t understand how you have yours written. You question that if God is love how can he be angry with us at the same time. Have you ever been a parent? I loved my sons without question, but there were times when they were disobedient and I became angry with them. I did not stop loving them. There is a saying: Love the sinner, but hate the sin. That is what that means. There are no contradictions in the Bible. Once you understand the meaning of the word being used it makes more sense. The Bible is written in 3 different languages and often we confuse the meanings of their words. English is a lot the same way. “It’s cool.” could be construed either as chilly, or as a nifty object or thought. If you know only one definition, what you’re reading would not make sense to you and seem contradictory.
    I could ask you how well you understand quantum physics, after all, you had math in school. You might argue that they’re not the same thing. That could be said of what we know about God. He created everything, including the angels in heaven of which Lucifer was one. Sure, it would be nice to have all the answers, but that takes away from our faith. We have to trust God. I know that He created all; that Jesus died for my sins; that I have to ask Him for forgiveness and to come into my heart. I’m satisfied with knowing that. As far as where sin came from, that’s explained in Genesis. Where heaven and hell are…well, doesn’t really matter. I believe God created everything and He knows where he put them. There’s a lot of things I figure we’ll learn the answer to once we get to heaven. While I’m on earth I will endeavor to my job and keep my faith, satisfied that God knows best about what I need to know. The quantum physics can wait until I get to heaven.

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  2. I’m afraid I’m going to have to disagree with you here, because I think you are missing the point. You’re absolutely correct when you state that man didn’t fall because he ate an apple. Man fell because he disobeyed God’s command not to partake of that particular tree (I sincerely doubt it was an apple tree, and nowhere in the Bible does it claim it was.) Neither, however, does the Bible make any claim supporting your erroneous (I believe) belief that the Fall was a slow process. Genesis 2:17 is instead very clear in that it states “when” you eat of it, not, sometime after, or beginning when, but quite simply and clearly “when you eat of it”. To believe anything else is to deny the clear meaning of Scripture. Much of what you say is very good, though your similarities in style to Socratic speech makes it somewhat difficult to follow at times, but overall, as much as I would like to approve of what I’ve read (because of the really good points you made in some places) there are just too many times where the Word of God is basically set aside in favor of man’s wisdom, and even places where it almost looks like God’s own veracity is being questioned. At any rate, I’m sure my humble is by no means of any crucial matter, so I wish you the best, and God bless.

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    • Like you, I questioned or disagreed with too many points to go into a lot of detail with my response. You caught something I missed. The Fall was not a slow process unless you count that Eve ate first and there’s nothing about how long it was before Adam disobeyed God and ate as well. I agree with you that he relied too much on man’s wisdom and not God’s.

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    • The account in Genesis is not to be taken literally, of course. It is purely symbolic language; and it is nonsense to imagine that physical, spiritual, and eternal death could come in consequence of eating any natural fruit. In fact, the literal interpretation of the Scripture in question quite defeats itself. We read: “Of every tree in the garden thou mayest freely eat; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof, thou shalt surely die” (Gen. ii. 16, 17). But he did not literally die in that day. For again we read: “And all the days that Adam lived were nine hundred and thirty years: and he died” (Gen. v. 5). The Scripture, therefore, has no reference to physical death, as the literalists suppose. It is exclusively spiritual death, the death of the soul, that is treated of.

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  3. Regarding Evil: In creating this world the phenomenon of ’cause and effect’ was put into play: you either ‘obey’ God’s law (act in harmony with His Truth) or you act outside of it to some degree great or small. When your actions are harmonious with it, this is ‘good’. When you act outside of it, this is ‘evil’. What you put out, you get back. This is ’cause and effect’, which is the nature of the life that Noah was instructed to save by safeguarding pairs of opposites, i.e., duality. Though we are imperfect as human beings, we must do the best we can.

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  4. Although there are some points of truth here, there are some deviations from it. Among which…

    What allowed Eve to be deceived into sin was that she chose to listen to the serpent, who said “Ye shall not surely die,” in contradiction to what God had said. She could not both accept this and take God at His word, and by accepting the serpent’s claim she agreed with his charge that God had lied. If we decide to also not take God at His word we lose the sure foundation of faith that we have in the Word of God.

    Never in the Bible is the account of creation and the fall claimed to be symbolic. God Himself, from His own mouth and written with His own hand, declared in the fourth commandment that “in six days the LORD made heaven and earth…” (Exo 20:11). We cannot both claim this did not happen and take God at His word.

    The fruit that Adam and Eve both ate needed no power in of itself to cause death, but was a simple test of loyalty. It was through their distrust of God and their act of disobedience toward their Creator that they found themselves even fearing to be seen by Him, as their sin had turned their hearts away from God. They had forfeited the eternal life that had been dependent on their willing obedience, and death was to be their punishment. In the day that they ate of that fruit their irrevocable death sentence was passed and they would surely die.

    God, “…not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance” (2Pe 3:9), and loving His creation beyond our understanding, enacted a plan of salvation to win us back to Him. The sacrificial system that was established immediately after the fall pointed to the eventual sacrifice of Jesus, the true Lamb of God, who said “And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all men unto Me.” (Jhn 12:32) By this God’s love was shown in its full, for “Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.” (Jhn 15:13) The rebellious and destructive nature of sin was shown in full contrast to the love of God. By viewing this we may understand the wickedness of sin and see God’s desire for us to turn back to Him, “for if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life.” (Rom 5:10)

    You appear to believe that there was no Adam who one day ate a fruit, through whom sin entered, though this man is listed in the genealogy of Jesus as “…Adam, which was the son of God.” (Luk 3:38) and Paul stated “Wherefore, as by ONE man sin entered into the world…” (Rom 5:12). Before Adam there was no man, “And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul…” (1Co 15:45)

    If we do not take God at His word, instead claiming that the Bible does not really mean what is written, then we make a liar of God and find ourselves grasping instead after “philosophy and vain deceit” (Col 2:8). Looking at the Greek roots we see that philosophy is the love of wisdom, yet the inspired Word of God declares “The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge…” (Pro 7:8).

    Because, as you know, God is “the same yesterday, and to day, and for ever” (Heb 13:8) and “All scripture is given by inspiration of God…” (2Ti 3:16) and “God is not a man, that he should lie…” (Num 23:19) it cannot be truth that the scriptures, given by God, contradict. The belief that they do is simply from misunderstanding what they mean.

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  5. Hi! Thanks for your follow, it is much appreciated. I’m happy I came to visit and explore your world. Your post is well written and logically thought out and I agree with many (but not all) of your conclusions. For myself i prefer not to go into doctrinal debates, but fully appreciate God choosing “unlearned and ignorant men” as Jesus disciples. I understand that in these days there is a need to expound the gospel in intellectual and reasoning terms (and God bless those that do so) but rejoice in the saying that “ye must become as a little child to enter the kingdom of Heaven”. I believe the truth is always simple and comes from the heart (understanding follows). For me my becoming a Christian long ago was a clear indication of the love, mercy and long suffering of God and I have been in love with His spirit and word ever since.
    As to the wrath and punishment of “sinners” I believe sin (particularly deliberate and premeditated choosing of evil) could be compared with being soaked in gasoline which when it comes into the presence of the light of God ignites in excruciating pain (hence they flee from His presence to hide as you noted). Whereas even as “sinners” (we all screw up from time to time) our confidence in the paternal love and mercy of God means we have worn no deceptive masks with Him. We know and seek His presence and cleansing. God’s arms are open to both for he loves us all good or bad but sadly not all may come to His presence (but I’m sure He has some plan for their eventual recovery.)

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    • hi claire
      your welcome,thank you for your thoughts,there always welcomed,i learned a long time ago that the wisdom of this world is foolishness to God.take care and God bless.stay in touch.

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  6. I agree God created all things good, even Satan before he got power hungry. He doesn’t control us like puppets he prefers if we choose freely, unlike Satan who is oppressive and tries to constantly impose his will on us.

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  7. “our Creator, gives to man, His creature, the prerogative of thinking, of willing, and of acting in freedom. In the exercise of the faculties with which he is endowed, man has the ability to receive truth into his understanding, and at the same time good into his will, and thus to live according to Divine order. Or, he can do the reverse of this—think what is false, will what is evil, and also live contrary to Divine order” – I would say from when man fell from grace, evil became inborn. We are the ones who now choose to let it rule us, or we choose to let the divine order guide us.
    Thanks for stopping by.

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  8. Sorry I can’t accept your interpretation of Genesis. Early Church fathers accepted what a grammatical historical reading of it revealed. A six day creation and a Sabbath which is the basis of our seven day week, God was establishing a pattern for man. – Fourth Commandment. There was no death in the world before man sinned. It was not a slow process. The FALL was an event which altered the world dramatically. Satan and Demons are clearly fallen angels. Evolution is a failed theory and the billions of years it requires also a fabrication. Noah’s Flood adequately explains fossils and appearance of age in the rocks. Recommend the website http://www.creation.com for answers to ALL your questions.

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    • But is that what the text LITERALLY says? If there was no sin before eating from the tree of knowledge, why did God punish Adam and Eve? If they had no knowledge of right and wrong were they guilty?

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    • It is certain that no serpent ever literally talked. Nor did the knowledge of good and evil ever literally grow on a tree. The serpent is mentioned in the Word to represent the sensual principle in man, that is, all things which belong to his senses. To be a full and perfect man, one requires the sensual principle also. But this must be made subordinate. The higher principles of human nature should rule in man, and not those of his lower nature. To allow the sensuous propensities to become predominant, is the beguilement of the serpent.

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    • The account in Genesis is not to be taken literally, of course. It is purely symbolic language; and it is nonsense to imagine that physical, spiritual, and eternal death could come in consequence of eating any natural fruit. In fact, the literal interpretation of the Scripture in question quite defeats itself. We read: “Of every tree in the garden thou mayest freely eat; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof, thou shalt surely die” (Gen. ii. 16, 17). But he did not literally die in that day. For again we read: “And all the days that Adam lived were nine hundred and thirty years: and he died” (Gen. v. 5). The Scripture, therefore, has no reference to physical death, as the literalists suppose. It is exclusively spiritual death, the death of the soul, that is treated of.

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